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January 18, 2018, 06:51:52 PM

Author Topic: Significance of Buddha Mudras  (Read 3737 times)

CarrotHead

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Significance of Buddha Mudras
« on: May 27, 2013, 03:04:35 AM »
Some types of Buddha Mudras:

Images of the Buddha were produced from the fifth century onwards. The sacred nature of the representation is reflected in the artistic goal of creating an aura of equanimity, perfection, and holiness. The large number of rules governing the execution of a portrayal or a statue require an erudite understanding of Buddhist symbolism. Any Buddha figure made by a skilled artist exhibits a multitude of characteristics that communicate subtle meanings and intentions to the viewer. The most important of these characteristics are perhaps the mudras, or hand gestures, of the Buddha. These well-defined gestures have a fixed meaning throughout all styles and periods of Buddha images.

1. Varada Mudra
2. Abhaya Mudra
3. Bhumisparsha Mudra
4. Dharmachakra Mudra
5. Dhyana Mudra
6. Vitarka Mudra
7. Namaskara Mudra

CarrotHead

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Re: Significance of Buddha Mudras
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2013, 03:12:24 AM »
Varada Mudra:



The Varada mudra (favourable mudra) signifies offering, welcome, charity, giving, compassion and sincerity.

The Varada mudra is nearly always shown made with the left hand by a revered figure devoted to human salvation from greed, anger and delusion.

The Varada mudra can be made with the arm crooked and the palm offered slightly turned up or in the case of the arm facing down the palm presented with the fingers upright or slightly bent.

The Varada mudra is rarely seen without another mudra used by the right hand, typically the Abhaya mudra. It is often confused with the Vitarka mudra, which it closely resembles.

In China and Japan during the Wei and Asuka periods respectively the fingers are stiff and then gradually begin to loosen as it developed through time, eventually leading to the Tang Dynasty were the fingers are naturally curved.

In India the Varada mudra is used in images of Avalokitesvara from the Gupta Period of the 4th and 5th centuries.

The Varada mudra is extensively used in the Buddha statues of Southeast Asia.


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Re: Significance of Buddha Mudras
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2013, 04:59:24 AM »
Mudra is the hand gesture right?

SingThaiDisco_V2

Re: Significance of Buddha Mudras
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2013, 04:59:24 AM »





CarrotHead

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Re: Significance of Buddha Mudras
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2013, 02:34:08 AM »
Mudra is the hand gesture right?
Yes, Boss. ;)

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Re: Significance of Buddha Mudras
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2013, 09:46:45 AM »


Found some more info... related to yours?

CarrotHead

  • Guest
Re: Significance of Buddha Mudras
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2013, 08:29:18 AM »


Found some more info... related to yours?

Looks pretty okay but it will be easier for forum members to see if the hand gestures are directly reflected on the Buddha. Something similar to what I have posted earlier. I did not continue posting because I hope other forum members can chip in and have fun posting too. ;)

SingThaiDisco_V2

Re: Significance of Buddha Mudras
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2013, 08:29:18 AM »
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